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What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about itraconazole. What this medicine is used for Itraconazole is used to treat certain fungal infections, such as: infections of the nails, skin, hands, feet or groin persistent candida (yeast) vaginal infections eye infections which have not responded to other treatment or which may be affecting vision candida (yeast) infections of the mouth or throat in patients with a weakened immune system generalised infections Itraconazole works by killing or stopping the growth of the fungus that causes the infection.

This medicine psychology of the unconscious not addictive. Itraconazole is not recommended for use in children and in the elderly. Before you psychology of the unconscious this medicine When you must not take it Do not take itraconazole if you have an allergy to: itraconazole any of the ingredients listed at the end of this leaflet Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: shortness of breath, wheezing or difficulty breathing swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of psychology of the unconscious body rash, itching or hives on the healthy skin Do not take itraconazole if you are also taking any of the following medicines: terfenadine, astemizole or mizolastine, used for allergies bepridil, felodipine, lercanidipine, ivabradine, ranolazine, eplerenone and nisoldipine, used for chest psychology of the unconscious (angina) or high blood pressure domperidone, used for nausea and vomiting ticagrelor, used to prevent heart attacks or strokes cisapride, used for certain digestive problems midazolam or triazolam, used to help you sleep or relax some medicines used to lower psychology of the unconscious cholesterol (e.

If you are not sure whether you should start taking this medicine, talk to your doctor. Before you start to take it Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, food, preservatives or dyes. Tell your doctor if you psychology of the unconscious or have had any of the following medical conditions: liver or kidney problems heart problems weakened immune system, such as neutropenia, AIDS or organ oral home cystic fibrosis Tell your doctor if you are breast feeding.

Taking other medicines Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, including any that you can get without a prescription from a pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop. Itraconazole must not be taken with some medicines. These include: terfenadine, astemizole or mizolastine, used for allergies bepridil, felodipine, lercanidipine, ivabradine, ranolazine, eplerenone or nisoldipine, used for chest pain (angina) or high blood pressure domperidone, used for nausea and vomiting ticagrelor, used to prevent heart attacks or strokes cisapride, used for certain digestive problems midazolam or triazolam, used to help you sleep or relax certain medicines used to lower your cholesterol psychology of the unconscious. Certain medicines may interfere with itraconazole and Lamisil (Terbinafine)- FDA well it works.

These medicines include: anticoagulants such as apixaban, coumarins and coumarin-like medicines such as warfarin, cilostazol, dabigatran and rivaroxaban used to slow blood clotting some medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e. How to take this medicine Follow all directions given to you by your doctor or pharmacist carefully. How much to take The usual doses are shown below, but your doctor may decide to adjust them for your individual needs.

Other skin infections: 2 capsules (200 psychology of the unconscious daily for 1 week. Eye infections: 2 capsules (200 mg) daily for 3 weeks. Mouth infections: 1 to 2 capsules (100 mg to 200 mg) daily for 4 weeks. Nail infections: Continuous nail therapy 2 capsules (200 mg) once daily for 3 months. Cyclic (pulse) nail therapy Fingernails only Week 1: Take 2 psychology of the unconscious twice daily.

How to take it Swallow the capsules whole with a glass of water. When to take it Take your medicine at about the same time each day after a meal. How long to take it for Continue taking your medicine for as long as your doctor tells you, even if the signs of infection have gone.

If you forget to take it If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take your next dose when you are meant to. Do not take a Diclofenac Sodium Ophthalmic Solution (Voltaren Ophthalmic)- FDA dose to make up for the dose that you missed.

If you are not sure what to do, ask your doctor or pharmacist. If you take too psychology of the unconscious (overdose) Immediately telephone your doctor or the Poisons Information Centre (telephone 13 11 26) for advice or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital if you think that you or anyone else may have taken too much of this medicine.

While you are using this medicine Things you must do If you are about to start taking a new medicine, tell your doctor and pharmacist that you are taking itraconazole. If you become pregnant while taking itraconazole, tell your doctor immediately. Things you must not do Do not take itraconazole to treat any other complaints unless your doctor tells you to.

Do not give itraconazole to anyone else, even if they have the same condition as you. Do not stop taking your medicine or lower the dosage without checking with your doctor. Side effects Tell your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if you psychology of the unconscious not feel well while you are taking this medicine.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice any of the following and they worry you: upset stomach, psychology of the unconscious pain or discomfort, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation unpleasant taste in your mouth.

Tell your doctor as soon as possible if you notice any of the following: inflammation of the pancreas tingling, numbness or weakness in the hands or feet increased heart rate swelling of hands, ankles, feet, legs or abdomen, shortness of breath, weight gain, fatigue, night-time waking oversensitivity to sunlight psychology of the unconscious or double vision, ringing in the ears, hearing loss (may be temporary or permanent) losing control of your bladder or urinating much more than usual The above list includes serious side effects that may require medical attention.

If any of the following happen, stop taking itraconazole and tell your doctor immediately or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital: fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools, yellowing of the skin or eyes (signs of a liver problem) rash, itching or hives on the skin, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, wheezing or trouble breathing (signs of severe allergy) widespread rashes with peeling skin and blisters in the mouth, eyes and genitals, or rashes with small pustules or blisters (signs of Stevens-Johnson syndrome) hearing loss symptoms - in very rare cases, temporary or permanent hearing loss has been reported.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice anything that is making you feel unwell. Storage and Disposal Storage Keep the capsules in the pack until it is time to take them.

Disposal If your doctor tells you to stop taking itraconazole or the expiry date has passed, ask your pharmacist what to do with any medicine that is left over.

Product description What it looks like Size "0el" hard gelatin white opaque capsules filled with off-white to cream coloured pellets and imprinted with 'ITR' psychology of the unconscious cap and '100' on body with TekPrint SW-9008 black ink.

AUST R 244473 Ingredients This medicine contains 100 mg of itraconazole as the active ingredient. This medicine also contains the following: hypromellose macrogol 20000 sucrose maize starch gelatin TekPrint SW-9008 Black Ink.

This medicine does not contain lactose, gluten, tartrazine or any other azo dyes. Sponsor Apotex Pty Ltd 16 Giffnock Avenue Macquarie Park NSW 2113 Australia Tel: (02) 8877 8333 Web: www1. Summary Table of Changes Subscribe to NPS MedicineWise Date published: 01 July 2019 Reasonable care is taken to provide accurate information at the time of creation.

Itraconazole has been widely used in the treatment of fungal disease including chronic necrotising pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) 1, 2. Its use has been associated with occasional reports of adverse cardiovascular events including congestive heart failure 3, hypertension (HT) 4, premature ventricular contractions 5 and even ventricular fibrillation 6. However, these adverse effects have been considered to be uncommon, if not rare, occurrences. From September, 1992 to April, 2001, the US Food and Drug Administration received only 59 reports of potential cases of congestive heart failure with the administration psychology of the unconscious itraconazole 3.

From January, 2005 to December, 2007, seven patients were diagnosed to have CNPA in our institution. Adverse cardiovascular events were found in three patients and suspected in one after the commencement of itraconazole therapy for a variable period of psychology of the unconscious weeks to 4 months. All patients were administered 400 mg of itraconazole, daily. The first patient was a 58-yr-old male who developed congestive heart failure after receiving 3 weeks of psychology of the unconscious therapy.

He had underlying diabetes mellitus (DM), HT and old tuberculosis (TB). He improved with diuretic therapy and itraconazole was withheld. Itraconazole therapy was stopped.

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